Sinapis – A Mustard Seedling’s Legacy Continues To Grow

Sinapis – A Mustard Seedling’s Legacy Continues To Grow

In 2020, we will be celebrating the beginnings of Sinapis as a start-up accelerator in Kenya a decade ago. From modest but committed dedication in 2010, focusing on small and growing businesses (SGBs) typically with 5 to 250 employees and promoting Kingdom business, Sinapis has grown into a global ecosystem of thousands of entrepreneurs worldwide.

  

How the Sinapis dream started

The Sinapis idea started when Karibu Nyaggah enrolled for an MBA at Harvard in 2008 and then coordinated a student trip to his home country of Kenya. He wanted to introduce his classmates to the innovative spirit of Kenya and the challenges that still exist in Africa. During the trip, he met Courtney Mills, a fellow Christian and Harvard grad student who was researching sustainable solutions to poverty. Her vision was to create an accelerator programme for start-up entrepreneurs in Kenya. Together they started dreaming of how the accelerator could advance God’s Kingdom practically while alleviating poverty.

 

The following year, Harvard funded Courtney Mills and a fellow-student to research the viability of launching an early-stage accelerator programme in Nairobi. They recommended the need for training entrepreneurs on how to grow successful businesses, how to navigate corrupt and unethical marketplaces, and how to integrate their faith with their businesses.

 

They called the organization Sinapis, derived from the Latin word used for the mustard seed that Jesus described to his disciples in Mark 4:31-32, symbolising the opportunity to accelerate early-stage businesses that could alleviate poverty and cultivate disciples of Jesus at the same time.

 

Gaining new momentum

Since 2017, an impactful footprint has been set in six more countries when Sinapis launched its first partnerships outside of Kenya with Innohub Foundation in Ghana and Bluefields Development in Brazil. The addition of Sinapis’s curriculum allowed these partners to deepen their training and serve a broader range of entrepreneurs. Then in 2018, Sinapis expanded to Uganda, and Innohub opened a programme in Liberia. In 2019 the demand continued to grow, with Sinapis courses now being offered in both Rwanda and Egypt too.

 

This initiative has grown into a movement of Kingdom entrepreneurs that is now gaining strong momentum. After doubling the Sinapis graduates during the past two years, a new impetus is visible as the organisation is growing towards its goal of training 10,000 entrepreneurs and further expanding into new countries and with new programmes in the years to come.

Sinapis has added programmes beyond its initial business accelerator to include an MBA-like academy, a start-up launchpad, community workshops, alumni events, and a global network of entrepreneurs, mentors, and investors. Sinapis graduates are also surveyed to track their collective business, social and spiritual impact annually.

 

How Sinapis Equips Entrepreneurs to Create a Kingdom Movement

Why focus on Entrepreneurs as the primary target group?

A quote by CEO Matthew Rohrs best summarises the viewpoint of Sinapis in this regard: “People who have a vision, the charisma to get others on board, and the tenacity to grow a company are a rare breed. We focus on supporting entrepreneurs who lead Small and Growing Businesses (SGBs) because these companies fuel the economy and account for up to 80% of new job growth worldwide. 

 

To achieve scale, entrepreneurs leading SGBs typically need more customised training and assistance in accessing capital. Their success goes far beyond the entrepreneur and brings employment and dignity to their community. As they grow their businesses, they create jobs and helpful products and services for others. And entrepreneurs are leaders. Their influence often grows alongside their companies.

When committed to Christ and integrating His ways in the marketplace, they are poised to have a tremendous long-term impact. They combat corruption, transform culture and stand as an example for people looking for answers.”

 

The socio-economic impact

Sinapis has been making a significant difference in the lives of participating entrepreneurs, their communities and the economies of countries in which they operate. We witness that what began as a seed has grown into a diverse and multi-national community of thousands of dedicated Kingdom-driven entrepreneurs with committed ongoing learning, discipleship and the connection to essential capital. In total, 3,941 entrepreneurs and 947 graduates have been trained by Sinapis through workshops and programmes.

 

The social impact that Sinapis entrepreneurs are making is meaningful, especially where the creation of sustainable jobs in areas of extreme poverty is extensive and has assisted in restoring dignity and promoting progress for all involved. In total, 2,467 new jobs have been created, and Sinapis graduates employed 4,863 people. Sinapis estimates that these jobs are impacting the lives of 24,315 dependents.

 

The Business Impact

Sinapis endorses the principle that as entrepreneurs build Kingdom businesses, they grow the economies of the countries in which they operate and transform the relevant societies. Consequently, they also spark spiritual renewal. According to the 2018 annual statistics, Sinapis graduates have collectively achieved 25.9 million US dollars in yearly revenue and raised a total of 24.1 million US dollars in capital. The annual revenue of their businesses increased by 53% per year on average, and 67% of the graduates were still in business three years after training.

 

The Spiritual Impact

The impact that Sinapis has made at a spiritual level on entrepreneurs since its inception in the countries mentioned has been far-reaching in terms of Kingdom building with widespread community significance. Diverse and expansive multi-discipline training and business modules have been developed and applied. The following figures indicate the success and impact of these modules:

  • 76% actively integrate faith into their businesses;
  • 50% launched spiritual or social impact programmes in their communities; and
  • 22% reported new followers of Christ through their businesses.

 

Mergon’s trust in Kingdom partnerships

The Mergon Foundation has regional strategies supporting over 100 ministry partners across South Africa, sub-Saharan Africa and North-Africa/Middle East. 

It is heartening to observe that the Kingdom partnership that Mergon formed with Sinapis in 2017 has evolved in a powerful testimony of Kingdom businesses that has subsequently blossomed. Sinapis work is blessed and has grown into a global entrepreneurial ecosystem of thousands of entrepreneurs around the world.

Neil Hart, Executive Head of the Foundation, recently wrote in a paper: “We strategically deploy our entrusted resources through well-chosen partnerships for the maximum expansion of God’s Kingdom. I can tell of entrepreneurs who work with other entrepreneurs across many African cities to disciple them to have a maximum impact through their business resources, bringing generosity and change. There are so many stories of hope in the nations.”

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Leading a fresh expression of discipleship in Africa

Leading a fresh expression of discipleship in Africa

The need to have a fresh expression of what church means in modern times has been around for a number of years. Today, there are countless different ways of doing ‘church’ that exists outside the box of what people think when they hear the word ‘church’.
“Change is often something that takes courage to implement, especially when it spans many denominations. There are some impactful examples of interdenominational partnerships,” says Etienne Piek, Regional Manager SA at Mergon Foundation. Mergon is an entrepreneurial private investment group that exists to impact lives and equip others to do the same.

Piek names one such example. “The work that one of our partners in Southern Africa, Fresh Africa, is doing is an example of the courage it takes to serve in the true sense of the word, and on a daily basis.”

Rev. Philip Botha, previously Africa Director of Fresh Expressions, and now National Director of Fresh Africa, retraces the history and early formation years of this pioneering mission to understand the work the local arm is doing today.

He recounts that it all started in 2004 when the Mission Shaped Church Report was published to reflect on what was already happening in society and to make recommendations to serve as best practice on the fresh expression of churches, irrespective of their denomination.

The report has gone on to be one of the most widely read and purchased Church of England reports ever. From this report, the Fresh Expressions movement was born as a partnership between the Church of England and the Methodist Church in response to the changing culture of church to meet the needs of the unreached and the unchurched. Rather than adhere to the “come to us” approach of church, Fresh Expressions seeked to “go and stay” where unchurched, de-churched and non-Christians are living.

“The world naturally evolves through seasons, cycles, rhythms and change,” says Rev. Botha. “But nowhere is this clearer than in most South African communities. Here we think of extreme poverty, senseless crime, non-existent infrastructure or access thereto, and a national unemployment crisis. We had to come to terms with the fact that the Fresh Africa mission operates in a unique Southern Africa context. This is vastly removed from the challenges parent movement Fresh Expressions is facing in the United Kingdom, where society in the current post-modernist era is moving to embrace secularism and shrinking church memberships.”

“It is very easy to see why every church thinks that their own way is the right way. We believe it is our duty to help guide the eleven member churches and four member ministries that each can operate in a unique way, but still be inclusive of unchurched and unreached communities. It is our DNA to urge church leaders to find new ways of attracting and including a fresh wave of members in a very unique way – by listening where God is already working, and not by asking God to help us fulfill our mission,” says Rev. Botha.

He urges that churches need to be trained in how to differentiate between missionary listening and asking God to follow orders of the church.

Upon asking what exactly missionary listening is, he explains excitedly that it is to listen to what the needs of communities are and then to provide the assistance needed to solve their challenges, be it not having access to clean, running water, the lack of a physical building for the community to gather in, the effect that the culture of gang violence has or lack of access to education.

In these situations, Rev. Botha says the act of organising a worship service really comes last, when most of the needs of the community are addressed, and the missionary organisations have won the respect of the community.

A proud example in action for Rev. Botha is of the Doornbacht informal settlement near Table View. He says it all started when he was invited to open the Table View police forum with prayer and where he started engaging in conversation with some of the Doornbacht residents who mentioned the circumstances they were living in. They invited him to a community leadership meeting.

“I learnt that there were no working toilets and only five working taps serving 10 000 residents. At that point, I realised how arrogant we must seem to God when we pray from the comfort of our churches and Bible study groups for Him to help ‘those in need’,” he says.

As we got a deeper understanding of the issue these citizens are facing, we realised that acts such as clothing donations to kids won’t cut it. When asked what residents needed, we were quite surprised by the response. They needed a physical building to conduct business, or community events, such as leadership meetings or recruitment drives, a place to serve as a voting station or a childcare facility. So we mobilised our members to physically build this community hub. We came a long way to win their respect and trust,” Rev. Botha says.

Fresh Africa sees diverse Christ-following congregations rediscovering God’s mission and developing mission-shaped communities in order to transform their communities.

“We need to have the courage to listen,” says Rev. Botha. “We should not assume we know God’s work, and the challenges communities are struggling with, which are most often challenges that are the exact barriers to discipleship. We have a long road of, mostly, listening ahead of us. But this takes us back to our core values as a missionary movement.”

Rev. Botha concludes that Fresh Africa recognises that the Holy Spirit uses the Bible as inspiration and guide, and that applying intentional listening to the voices in our local communities is to be prayerfully attentive to what God is doing.

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Three Defining Characteristics Of Courageous Leaders

Keri-Leigh Paschal - Executive Director, Nation Builder

Three Defining Characteristics Of Courageous Leaders

Every generation has called for more leaders – courageous leaders – who will stand up for good, wholesome principles that have the betterment of people and planet at their core. We do know we need them, across all sectors of our society. But do we need to define that they are ‘courageous’ leaders? Or is courage a given character trait of good leadership?

Courage is a vital virtue of good leaders, “those who would rather challenge what needs to be changed and pay the price, than remain silent and slowly die inside” (Andy Stanley). Yet every situation that calls for courage involves some kind of uncertainty and some kind of risk, which in turn implies vulnerability. Not a characteristic most would associate with courage, but one that Nelson Mandela intimately understood: “I learned that courage was not the absence of fear, but the triumph over it. The brave man is not he who does not feel afraid, but he who conquers that fear.”

It takes courage to see challenges as opportunities, to address injustices past and present, and to shape society’s future direction. And the courageous pioneers who do, share these three main characteristics: They have deep conviction, they can effectively tap into unrealised opportunities, and they view themselves with humility.

Deep Conviction
Leaders of businesses that make a tangible difference in society – while also making a profit – have a passion for the wellbeing of people. This deep conviction leads to a business approach that is centred on being a force for good in society, a selfless and authentic motive outside of profit.

Profit is essential – because without profit a business would not be sustainable, and the passion to make a difference, would remain a mere desire and not become reality – yet the conviction to be good and do good determines the ultimate end of the business, by shaping both the day-to-day decisions and long-term investments that together ensure a lasting positive impact.

Unrealised Opportunities
Courageous leaders view the world differently. They see frustrations, constraints and differing perspectives as fuel for innovation that drives solutions.

They are curious and can be found immersing themselves in new contexts to give them a broader understanding of and insight into their ever-changing landscapes. This enables them to identify where pain points exist and drives their passion to engage more effectively through their business to provide a different service or offering and thereby turn unrealised opportunities into real gains. 

Humble Approach

“True humility, scientists have learned, is when someone has an accurate assessment of both his strengths and weaknesses, and he sees all this in the context of the larger whole. He’s a part of something far greater than he. He knows he isn’t the centre of the universe. And he’s both grounded and liberated by this knowledge. Recognising his abilities, he asks how he can contribute. Recognising his flaws, he asks how he can grow.”

(Ashley Merryman, The Washington Post).

Humility is not thinking less of yourself. It is having a right view of your skills, character and position. It takes a courageous leader to not have all the answers and to see the skills and understanding of those better equipped to meet the challenge. It takes vulnerability to seek assistance, ask good questions and build partnerships to achieve the greatest possible outcomes.

The three characteristics briefly described above are simple, yet require authenticity in heart and approach to truly be a force for social good.

In the social development landscape, we often see business people impose their views and preferred solution on those in the development sector. However, there are many credible social impact groups who have already learned the hard lessons and therefore understand the landscape. The key is to find the right partner and have the humility to trust their judgement on how to engage constructively in building the social fabric of our nation. Those investing in these partnerships experience greater joy with each life that is transformed.

Within our local business community, where the economic and social realities are challenging, courageous leadership is the only approach that can ultimately redefine our society.

Let us engage our entrepreneurial spirit, let us think creatively, and let us work together in finding solutions to the unique complexities that our colourful nation presents us. Let us find the courage in each of us, and let us lead

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Courageous Ministry Leadership

Neil Hart - Executive Head Mergon Foundation​

Courageous Ministry Leadership

It’s a lonely role leading anything. Once the excitement dies down the responsibility kicks in. There are so many questions. Are your people inspired by the mission & committed through the hard times? Are they living together in a healthy culture and growing in their contribution?

Is the organisation operating efficiently with good governance? Are funders hearing stories of the contribution in society and coming alongside you to enhance your efforts? Is the Board involved and helping to lighten your load? And greater pressure…are they inspired by your leadership?

We understand the pressure you feel, leading a ministry requires deeply courageous leadership.
The good news is that there is no perfect leader. Even the best I know are not complete leaders. We all have faults and blind spots. We are all a work in progress in the Master’s hands. Be vulnerable with those you lead – I’ve found that the strongest, most effective leaders are insecure. The reality will surprise you. You are probably the very best leader; for now, you are what your organisation needs in this season.

At Mergon, we partner with over a hundred ministries and leaders across 30 countries. We journey with them in 3-year partnership cycles so we get to see a few things in this time together. Leading a ministry is selfless and tough, but very little in life compares to giving your life away for something that means so much or reverberates so deeply into eternal realms.

Over time we have seen some healthy organisations operating in ways that rival the best of corporate best practice. Sadly this is generally the exception to the rule.

Jim Collins, in a foreword to the book Engine of Impact, wrote that “most nonprofits limp along, operating far below their potential impact”.  Even with wonderful, committed leadership and teams, the podium for healthy organisations is sparsely populated.

From over 25 years in business, I can tell you that there are few corporate leaders that have to deal with as much pressure as some of the ministry/NGO leaders I have worked with. In business there are generally well paid, qualified staff to delegate to, in ministry often not. In business, we protect our hearts from the messiness of people’s lives, delegating this to the HR department. In ministry, we live with the emotion 365 days a year.

Having been a CEO in business and in ministry, I want to share 5 points that enable more effective leadership and will imbue you with courage:
Win trust by being personal – Great leaders know how to be personal. It’s not a ministry thing, great CEOs in all walks understand this. The bulk of being personal relates to circumstances or information that is not work related. Marriage, kids, financial pressures and needs, fulfilment, rest etc. Do you know these details in your team’s lives? The better you do this, the more trust you will have. The advantage of trust? Well, its immeasurable really, you simply cannot lead well without it.

Empower your team with greater responsibility – expect much from your team by showing respect for the individual skills and experience they have. I have learned that everyone comes with a past that should be respected and given due consideration. Your volunteer or manager may have a degree in something that they are not putting their daily time to. Find space for this to be expressed, and you’ll be amazed at how much more people come to life when they use their skills, interests, training or experience. As a leader, its your responsibility to uncover and maximise this.

Organisational clarity – ministry leaders are often so filled with passion for the work that one expects everyone will thrive on the same purpose. The truth is that many employees thrive on clarity. A CEO must create and communicate organisational clarity to every single member of the team. It is a truth that humans needs to understand (and buy into) what they are contributing to and how their success (or lack thereof) impacts the outcome of the work. Think of your team members, does each one know for certain what they are meant to be doing and what a difference their contribution makes to the overall goal?

Share vision often – Real clarity comes with a compelling vision. A CEO must be great at articulating vision, and doing it regularly. It is astounding how much vision-casting is required to keep a team focused and excited. Find several ways to communicate the same vision: through video, words, pictures, in Keynote presentations or through drama…do what it takes to regularly keep the vision clear and compelling.

Raise leaders not followers – if you asked me what the single most undervalued skill of CEOs is I’d say it is the raising of leaders. There are a few important aspects to doing this well. The first is identification. For me, this is a combination of prayer and using personality tools (of which there are many available) to discern good candidates. Secondly we should test leaders-to-be. You can always rely on people with tested character, those who have been through the fire. Find ways of testing faithfulness in small and big ways. Lastly a CEO needs to be able to call out the gifts and talents that they see in prospective leaders. There is little that accelerates growth in an individual than someone who believes in them and tells that how good they are at specific things.

There is little more fulfilling than leading an organisation or team that is healthy, passionate and effective, contributing to growing God’s Kingdom. A healthy team will make you sleep well at night, only kept awake by the God-given mandate and vision you carry.

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Investment in courage at Atterbury blooms, 25 years on

Francois Van Niekerk - Founder & Chairman Mergon Group

Investment in courage at Atterbury blooms, 25 years on

After three centuries of Apartheid rule, Nelson Mandela became South Africa’s first black and nationally elected president on 10 May 1994. “

Never, never again will this beautiful land experience the oppression of one by another,” 
said Mandela upon his inauguration.

Twenty-five years ago, South Africans were facing unchartered territories on a social, political and economic level. Democracy was born. But it was a young concept, and some had tremendous hope, others were fearful of the unknown. At the time, for one group of people it has taken courage to work towards a new national order, for another group to submit the leadership they fought to keep, and for another to graciously welcome and accept the change that followed. 

Leaders calculate courage
In business deal- and decision-making, we often navigate the same fears. Twenty-five years ago, I took a calculated chance, but a chance nonetheless, on a young junior article clerk, Louis van der Watt. Louis expressed a strong interest in property, and I had a good feeling about him, so I offered him a partnership deal. 

This turned out to be the embodiment of a courageous investment turned successful venture that not only grew from strength to strength but went on to have touched, improved and enhanced the lives of so many people. Not only is Atterbury successfully bringing people together in safe and beautiful surroundings, but we think of the more than 650 Atterbury Trust bursary students, and the impact that has been made in the lives of Atterbury’s employees and their extended families. Part of the company’s legacy is that Atterbury’s developments make an impact on people’s quality of life.

I am deeply grateful for the material success of Atterbury. But most rewarding to me is to have seen how Louis has exponentially enhanced the founding principles and standards. How he eventually crafted a business with a full house of all the qualities required for enduring greatness. Louis believes strongly in business, assuming a leadership role, voicing opinions and creating opportunities. 

Leadership can be a lonely place, especially within the cut-throat property industry. Louis quickly established himself as a leading figure in the South African property industry. He is widely respected, and his style is probably best described by a quote from Alan Greenspan, former Chairman of the US Federal Reserve: “I have found no greater satisfaction than achieving success through honest dealing and strict adherence to the view that for you to gain, those you deal with should gain as well.”

I make no secret that my forty years of exposure to picking and cultivating business partners, Atterbury Group’s CEO proves a distinct career highlight for me because of his uncompromising values and his unassailable credibility quotient. Louis is Atterbury. He is the acknowledged architect, rainmaker and driving force responsible for moulding Atterbury into a premium international property group. 

Marrying profit with people
Today, looking back over a quarter of a century of investment in the property sector, we are able to recognise that continued courage has often catapulted investment decisions into positive societal impact. 

Yes, the landscape is very different today. We had to adapt politically and geographically in business. However, the real challenges facing the business sector are mostly to do with political undercurrents of bad governance. 

The country’s potential can be unlocked, but only through a radical new approach to leadership and a new form of constructive, cooperative governance. Courage, creative thinking and the can-do SA attitude is needed to support our government. I’m grateful to see the mounting realisation in corporate circles realising that communal goodwill and maximising profit are anything but mutually exclusive. 

Richard Branson redefines success as “doing good at a profit”. The growing belief is that for capitalism to prolong its shelf life, we need to explore the new concept Bill Gates calls “Social Capitalism”. The business game has changed. Now, to succeed, you need to make a profit while you do good; and the latter way beyond the odd charity handout. I believe business should shift its values from a singular profit focus to caring for people, communities and the planet in order to become true catalysts for change on a social, political and economic level.

But beyond this, my walk with God in business reinforced my own belief in the need for SA business and our civil society to start focusing on sharing and forgiveness. The Gini coefficient and “hate index” are both at breaking point. 

Under construction
Atterbury’s sustained high-road performance, and Mergon’s decreasing shareholding presented the Mergon Group with several cash-realisation opportunities. It certainly was the major source of capital that enabled Mergon’s widespread diversification programme. In context, it makes Louis and the entire Atterbury family significant contributors to the Mergon quest for serving the expansion of the Kingdom through business. 

Despite Louis being the almost overwhelming dominant force, he also meticulously developed and nurtured a substantial number of proteges. In a new era where Louis van der Watt is no longer operational head in South Africa, I have no doubt that the Atterbury reputation for unabated progress will be upheld, given the acknowledged quality of the company’s board, senior management and staff.  

 In time this will emerge as a significant part of his legacy. 

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Mergon’s Journey – The Courage To Surrender

Pieter Faure - Mergon Group CEO

Mergon’s Journey – The Courage To Surrender

Since Mergon’s establishment almost forty years ago, courageous leadership has been one of its most enduring character traits.  It was instrumental in navigating the vulnerable start-up years in the early 1980s; in surviving the crisis of economic sanctions; in capitalising on opportunities at the dawn of democracy in transitioning to a new generation of leadership in 2008 and then in backing a next wave of entrepreneurs that grew and diversified Mergon over the past ten years.  

There are many more such instances that come to mind, notably each of these represents key junctures in our journey.  It has always required faith and invariably involved a degree of risk, but once accomplished, it set us on a new path to success and greater impact.  However, when I reflect on Mergon’s journey, the moments that I believe required the most courage from us as a leadership team has been of a different kind.  It is the courage to surrender.  

Let me explain.  Mergon Foundation, with its Kingdom Impact mandate, is the 70% shareholder in the Mergon Group.  As such, we have come to respectfully view God as our de-facto majority Shareholder.  As with any normal majority shareholder in a business, we believe there are certain decisions of significance which are reserved as Shareholder matters.  In such matters, one will typically consult the majority Shareholder and then wait for His answer – not moving forward until such time.  

One such example was when we needed to decide whether to move forward with our largest start-up investment to date, the co-founding of King Price Insurance.  We had done all our due diligence but decided to surrender the final decision to God in prayer, and not move forward until we felt we clearly heard from God.  For me, as a leader, the reality of truly letting go of such an important decision was very much outside my comfort zone – like most leaders I prefer being in control, especially since God’s timing and guidance on such matters often looks very different from what we in our human capacity might have in mind.

After much prayer from our team, our board and partners, we eventually felt God gave a clear release for us to go ahead, but with a caveat – that we should not go it alone.  With the deadline fast approaching, we eventually found a like-minded partner to journey with us, and we proceeded with the investment.   Since then, despite many challenges, more capital and a longer time than expected, King Price Insurance has become an incredible success story, and it is quickly becoming a key part of our investment portfolio.   

This shouldn’t come as a surprise to us; rather it should be an encouragement of what is possible if we as leaders display the courage to surrender our own plans, dreams and concerns to God, to prayerfully wait on Him and walk in relationship with Him.

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